Watch Godspeed

It was a few months ago now that a friend recommended to me a unique film project entitled Godspeed: The Pace of Being Known. I carved out some leisurely space late one afternoon at the office, sat down and watched the film, and it has been stirring with me ever since.  I actually just rewatched it this morning.

 

Godspeed tells the story of one American pastor’s journey to serve a parish in Scotland and its impact on his life and ministry. Or as the website puts it– What happens when a city boy with a pocket full of sermons, lands in a Scottish parish? 

 

The story has a far broader audience than pastors or missionaries. For all of us who are perhaps sensing that the pace of our lives might be squeezing out the things that are most important, I would encourage you to spend time with this story.  Godspeed reminded me of Dorothy Bass’s words when she asks,

“How can we live faithfully and with integrity here, where the pace of existence is so fast and life’s patterns are changing all around us? Can we conduct our daily lives in ways that help us not just to get by but to flourish–as individuals, as communities, and as a society, in concert with all creation and in communion with God?” 

 

So … enough set up; find some leisurely space, sit down and watch Godspeed. My favorite character is a Scotsman named Alan Torrance. You will meet him right off the bat.

 

Enjoy. Ponder. And let me know what it is stirring in your mind and heart.  And may we all be open to living Godspeed…

 

Watch Godspeed

Godspeed was shot in three days, in three villages, by three friends. What began as a five minute video ended as a half-hour portrait of the people and places who had taught Matt to repent & rest.

 

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Leading Adults Well… Some Reminders

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I have a hunch that as a reader of this blog you lead adults and care about their ongoing development. With my “Practical Pam” hat firmly on, let me encourage you with my top three non-negotiable adult learning tips. You will notice similarities between them.

 

I challenge you to identify an upcoming adult meeting, small group, or important gathering, thinking about how to integrate these strategies as you lead.

 

1. Ask and Include.

Resist the urge to be the answer-man/woman. There is so much more to be gained by asking and including participants’ input before you begin, when you gather, and all along the way. “Why did you choose to come? What expectations do you have? What will make this a good use of your time? What do you hope for?”

 

In the process of including others through our questions we gain so much more than answers. We demonstrate our ability to listen, earn respect, observe, build enthusiasm, show that we are in this together, and create a warm, safe, trusting environment.

 

2. The power of dialogue.

A couple of statements we repeat around VP3 are, “conversation creates culture” and “the answers are in the room.” Both mandate a way of being together that put a priority on contribution from everyone, through a process of questions, reflection and generous conversational space.

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What is my legacy?

William Tyndale (1494 - 1536)

William Tyndale (1494 – 1536)

     Things were very different just 500 years ago. The Bible was available in Latin – ordinary people like you and me did not have access to the Scriptures.

 

     That didn’t seem right to William Tyndale. We all recognize his name – the man who defied the King of England to translate the Scriptures into English. His efforts changed England and changed the world.

 

     But do you recognize the name Humphrey Monmouth? I didn’t until I recently read the book, “Gospel Patrons,” by John Rinehart.

 

     Monmouth supported William Tyndale – his life and his work – and his zeal to get the Bible into the hands of people like you and me. The activities of Monmouth and Tyndale were illegal and eventually both were imprisoned. Tyndale was hanged and burned at the stake. God used their passion and sacrifice to change the course of history and the Church. Today, we can thank these two faithful visionary men every time we open our Bibles.

 

     Think about the life change God brought about through your time in The Journey. What if that “change” was replicated in even more lives and churches across North America? What if more church attenders became even more dedicated followers of Jesus, considering first His way instead of our own? What could be the strength of God’s Church in Canada and the US if that happened?

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How Deeply Rooted Am I?

 

Tall Tree-Color

An important question we all need to be asking ourselves is, “How deeply rooted am I with God?”

 

 

           How blessed is the man

           Who does not walk in the counsel

                  of the wicked,

              Nor stand in the path of sinners,

              Nor sit in the seat of scoffers!

           But his delight is in the law of the LORD,

              And in His law he meditates

                  day and night.

           He will be like a tree

              Firmly planted by streams of water,

              Which yields its fruit in its season

              And its leaf does not wither;

           And in whatever he does, he prospers.

                                              (Psalm 1:1-3)

 

From my perspective, there can (basically) be three possibilities.  Since this is about being “deeply rooted,” lets look at trees as the example…

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A front row seat on life transformation

Alice Shirey has had the opportunity of facilitating over 40 folks in multiple A Way of Life groups over the past two years. These are people who have completed The Journey and taken the next step to walk through our A Way of Life process. I asked her to reflect upon what she had been noticing in these groups, what’s been standing out to her as she considers the many different people that have participated. Here are Alice’s reflections: 


AliceShireyAs a two-time facilitator of A Way of Life, I have had a front row seat at some of God’s best work; the transformation of lives. It never ceases to amaze me, and often brings me to tears.

 

A few things are especially sweet:

 

     1. The honesty in the room.

 

I don’t know if it is the overflow of vulnerability from the shared experience of The Journey class, or the nature of the curriculum, but I have not witnessed much “faking it” over the last two years. Even in large group discussions, the honesty, vulnerability and trust have been palpable. When this kind of environment occurs in the church, growth is often inevitable.

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Seeing The Tree in the Forest

It is quite a deal when you discover something new from something familiar.  You may have driven by that section of the forest a 110 times, and yet this time you noticed that one particular tree slightly hidden but somehow on this one day more obvious than all the others.  The unique color and type set it apart from the rest.  It is so obvious.  Makes you wonder why you had not really seen it before.  Your perspective of that familiar bush is slightly and refreshingly different because of the one very obvious tree that caught your attention.

 

  tree in a forest

 

It is helpful from time to time to take a closer look in order to see the tree in the forest.  And when we do it often has the capacity to change the way we see the forest, making it seem refreshingly new.

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How am I changing my world?

Andrew-Halverson-Monarch-Caterpillar

One definition of the word “catalyst” is “a stimulus to change.”

 

What happens when someone becomes a catalyst for any type of change? Maybe you’re the catalyst in your home for a change to healthier eating. Or maybe you’re the catalyst in your church for a move toward more intentional discipleship.

 

I recently made a trip to Indianapolis, Indiana where I met with pastors, facilitators, and financial partners of VantagePoint3. Quickly I found a common denominator in what I was hearing. One name, Beth Booram. Almost all of the people I met had been pointed to VP3 through the influence of this one woman who believes in the impact God is making on lives. 

 

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“co-editing” our story…

I_Want_You_blank_Uncle_Sam_0“Promotion & Recruitment” is my title at VantagePoint3.  To be completely honest, when I first started in this role, I very strongly disliked (bordering on hated) my title.  I was fine with the “Promotion” part.  It was the “Recruitment” part of my title that I did not like.  One part of my role is connecting with new pastors and churches and inviting them to partner with us.  Technically, that is the definition of “Recruitment.”  However, who wants to talk to a “recruiter”?  I felt as though that title had a negative stigma attached to it.  A “recruiter” is someone who wants something from you…you meet with a recruiter to “sign your life away.”  I often wondered how big of a hindrance that title would be…how big of a barrier it would be to beginning a conversation.

 

In the last couple of months I’ve developed a new passion for both the “Promotion” & the “Recruitment” parts of my title.  I have a desire to reverse the negative stigma associated with the word “recruiter.”

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…they ate & were filled…

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In those days, the multitude being very great and having nothing to eat, Jesus called His disciples to Him and said to them,  “I have compassion on the multitude, because they have now continued with Me three days and have nothing to eat.  And if I send them away hungry to their own houses, they will faint on the way; for some of them have come from afar.”  Then His disciples answered Him, “How can one satisfy these people with bread here in the wilderness?”  He asked them, “How many loaves do you have?” And they said, “Seven.”  So He commanded the multitude to sit down on the ground. And He took the seven loaves and gave thanks, broke them and gave them to His disciples to set before them; and they set them before the multitude.  They also had a few small fish; and having blessed them, He said to set them also before them.  So they ate and were filled, and they took up seven large baskets of leftover fragments.  Now those who had eaten were about four thousand.

Mark 8: 1-9 (NKJV)

 

A few weeks ago I read Mark 8.  For some reason this story captured my as it never has before.  I promptly turned to Matthew 15, Luke 9, and John 6 to read the other  Gospel accounts.  Since then, I have not really been able to read beyond this.  It captured me and I’ve continued reading all 4 of the Apostles’ accounts…

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A Pathway For Adult Development

19 years ago I followed a nudge to do what I could to help pastors and the leaders in local churches pay greater attention to the development of their adults.  At the time I knew part of the concern was a leadership one, and so much of what I put my hand to was couched in the language of “leadership development.”  And, in some respect, I was on to something.

 

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